Federal Government releases preliminary 2020 census finding; Alabama keeps all congressional seats

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WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States Census Bureau on Monday afternoon released its preliminary report on the 2020 census, and Alabama officials are breathing a sigh of relief. Expected to lose up to two Congressional seats, the state’s reported population of 5,030,053 was sufficient to retain all seats. 

On Monday afternoon, Gov. Kay Ivey tweeted, “I am extremely pleased that we will keep all seven of our current seats in the U.S. House to provide valued and needed voices to advocate for our state and our people for the next 10 years,” and “Our success in the census was certainly a group effort across the entire state, and I offer my heartfelt thanks to everyone who played a part.”

The total reported U.S. population was 331,108,434 (a 7.4% increase over the 2010 census), with another 3,285,874 residing in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. The south was the fastest-growing region in terms of population, with a 10.2% increase over 2010, followed by the west at 9.2%. Alabama’s percentile growth was 5.1%. 

Growth patterns indicate that more people are heading for places with wide open spaces. The largest percentile population increases included:

  • Utah – 18.4%
  • Idaho – 17.3%
  • Texas – 15.9%
  • North Dakota – 15.8%
  • Nevada – 15.0%

Local data for counties and municipalities is not yet available.

Who gained seats and who lost?

Seats in the U.S. House of Representatives are based on population, with a 435-seat cap on the total number who can serve. When one state’s population increases enough to gain a seat, another state must lose one.

The states listed below won or lost seats. The first number is 2020 population, the second (with + or -) indicates seats gained or lost.

California 39,576,757 . . . -1 

Colorado 5,782,171 . . . +1 

Florida 21,570,527 . . . +1 

Illinois 12,822,739 . . . -1 

Michigan 10,084,442 . . . -1 

Montana 1,085,407 . . . +1 

New York 20,215,751 . . . -1 

North Carolina 10,453,948 . . . +1 

Ohio 11,808,848 . . . -1 

Oregon 4,241,500 . . . +1 

Pennsylvania 13,011,844 . . . -1 

Texas 29,183,290 . . . +2

West Virginia 1,795,045 . . . -1 

Does everyone count?

According to the census report, yes. New York State would have retained all of its seats with just 89 more reported residents. Arizona would have gained a seat with 10 more residents, and Idaho was a mere three residents away from gaining a seat.

 

See the 2020 census preliminary report at https://www.census.gov/data/tables/2020/dec/2020-apportionment-data.html.

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W.C. Mann

craig@cullmantribune.com